BFI reviews policy on unpaid interns

This item appeared in the BECTU journal Stage Screen and Radio recently:

Stage Screen & Radio April/May 2013

 BFI reviews internships

The British Film Institute is to review its practice of hiring unpaid interns after a campaign by Intern Aware which works closely with the union.  Gus Baker of Intern Aware was contacted in February by unemployed graduate Neil Jones.  He aspires to a career in the media and had applied for a BFI internship but had had to withdraw as he could not afford to work for no pay.  He told Intern Aware that 18 people were currently unpaid interns at the publicly funded organisation and he felt this was wrong.

Baker sent a freedom of information request to the BFI about compulsory redundancies which established that after the BFI had cut 72 jobs they appeared to have been replacing some of them with unpaid interns on up to six month contracts.

Questions were asked in the House of Commons and Culture Secretary Maria Miller responded that it was departmental policy that all interns receive the minimum wage.

The BFI board of governors tabled an emergency motion at their board meeting and have now agreed to review the practice of hiring unpaid interns to do work that should be carried out by paid staff.

Intern Aware is supported by BECTU and based out of BECTU head office.

Gus Baker said: “The BFI is a publicly funded body and should therefore uphold the highest standards.  I trust that they will come to their senses and start to treat interns appropriately in accordance with the Arts Council’s official guidance.”

 

BFI’s unpaid interns

A report in the Evening Standard today:

BFI fails to get with the jobs programme

14 February 2013

Has the British Film Institute had a rethink over taking on unpaid interns? Labour MP Stella Creasy asked arts minister Ed Vaizey what he made of the BFI ad for 18 unpaid interns, in light of government recommendations that interns are paid the minimum wage. Vaizey replied that the “BFI is currently considering the future of the scheme”.

The BFI, headed by Amanda Nevill, had to cut 72 jobs when its funding was slashed in 2011. It warns that if it has to introduce paid internships this could “dramatically reduce the opportunities that can be afforded, and possibly prevent the continuation of the scheme altogether. This would be a great pity at a time when more young people than ever are seeking entry to the British film industry which, in turn, benefits from such grassroots talent.”

Perhaps the BFI could join the organisations signing up to the Standard’s Ladder For London campaign to help the young find paid apprenticeships?

BFI fails to get with the jobs programme – Diary – News – London Evening Standard